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Build a Pallet shelter village in three steps

August 20, 2021

Pallet shelter villages provide unhoused people the dignity and security of private units, with access to a resource net of onsite social services.

Tarzana Tiny Home Village in Los Angeles, CA.

Pallet shelter village in Los Angeles, CA.

People who live in Pallet's nearly 40 shelter villages across the country are on their way to creating a stable life. These shelter villages addressing homelessness were built by Pallet in collaboration with cities, counties and nonprofits. Each village is unique and a reflection of the larger community. These villages all have two things in common: a commitment to provide the dignity and security of private units within a community, and provide a resource net of onsite social services, food, showers, laundry, and more to help people transition into permanent housing. Our villages allow partners to stay together, pets are welcome, and people can bring their possessions with them.

Here’s a high level overview of what’s needed to create a Pallet shelter village.

1. Pallet Shelters

The foundation of every village is shelter. Each of the panels of our shelter is fiberglass reinforced plastic with a foam insulating core, aluminum framed, and can be constructed in under an hour. We offer two sizes: 64 sq. ft. and 100 sq. ft.

Both shelter sizes are designed to be priced at significant savings compared to traditional construction, which helps to maximize the number of people who can be offered shelter. Similarly, budget saved on shelter can be reinvested into on-site, wraparound services for the shelter village’s residents, a critical piece of their pathway to stability. 

Standard features:

Accessory options:

*Allows for flexibility and shelter customization to meet both the needs of the climate and occupancy load

2. Build infrastructure

Site selection:

Pallet shelter villages can be built on any surface, from a grassy field to a vacant lot. Most importantly, it should be a relatively level surface with enough space for the shelters. Some villages, such as Skagit First Step Center in Burlington, WA, have placed Pallet shelters on concrete pads. Each site needs access driveways for emergency services.

Location:

Proximity to essential services such as public transportation, social services, employment opportunities, grocery stores, hospitals and primary care is best.

Electrical:

There are a number of options to bring electricity to a site.

Green energy powers Casitas de Esperanza in San Jose, CA

Green energy powers Casitas de Esperanza in San Jose, CA

Sewer/Water:

One of five Pallet bathroom configurations in the finalization process at our research and development factory.

One of five Pallet bathroom configurations in the finalization process at our research and development factory.

3. Select a service provider 

Providing onsite social services is crucial to the success of Pallet shelter villages. An organization already assisting people experiencing homelessness is equipped to handle their distinctive needs. They must create a safe environment where people can stabilize and heal, because living unhoused is a traumatic experience.

Resources for residents: 

Roya talks with a Hope  of the Valley Rescue Mission case manager at Reseda Tiny Home Village in Los Angeles, CA

Roya talks with a Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission case manager at Reseda Tiny Home Village in Los Angeles, CA

Whether community leaders choose to build a Pallet shelter village or another alternative to address the growing homelessness crisis, the cost of doing nothing is steep. Our unhoused neighbors deserve compassion, dignity, and a secure place to rebuild their lives.

If you’re interested in building a Pallet shelter village contact our team

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